2018 Annual Conference Agenda

SCHEDULE  IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE
Wednesday - Thursday - Friday
Wednesday, October 3, 2018 / Pre-Conference
11:30 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. Registration Desk Open

12:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
(Pre-Conference Tour)

Separate Registration Required

Tour of Local Stormwater Projects
Join us for a tour of innovative stormwater projects in the Hilton Head area. There are a limited number of seats available and we anticipate the tour filling up quickly. Register today! Transportation will leave the hotel lobby promptly at 12:30 p.m. and will return no later than 4:00 p.m. Please dress casually and wear comfortable shoes.  

1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
(Pre-Conference Workshop)
3 credits

Separate Registration Required

Innovative Public Education and Information Campaigns
The need for public education on stormwater related activities is ever increasing and new approaches are always evolving. Raising awareness and changing the habits of residents have a significant and positive affect on our streams, lakes, and watersheds. This session will explore ways to communicate and engage the public. Case studies highlighting innovative technologies and successful public/private partnerships targeting education and promoting good behavior will be reviewed.

Crystal Bishop, Water Quality Manager
Hamilton County, TN

John Butler, Outreach Manager
Gwinnett County, GA

Don Ceccarelli, PE, CFM, Program Manager
Mecklenburg County, NC

Robert Gecy, Application Developer
Beaufort County, SC 

Eric Larson, PE, CPSWQ, AICP, CFM, Stormwater Utility Manager
Beaufort County, SC

Thursday, October 4, 2018 / Regular Conference
8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Registration Desk Open
8:00 a.m. - 8:45 a.m. Continental Breakfast (by registration desk)

8:45 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.
(General Session)
1.25 credits

Welcome & Opening Address

Hillary Repik, President
Southeast Stormwater Association 

Trey Glenn, Administrator
US EPA Region 4

 

New Initiatives in Stormwater Management–a Southeast Perspective
This presentation will give you a better understanding of how new permitting programs and proposed regulations can impact your jurisdiction, and how local governments in other states are responding. A panel will discuss the new regulations and their potential impacts, and strategies for implementation in their jurisdiction and state. Audience questions/answers will be encouraged.

Hillary Repik, President
Southeast Stormwater Association

Jeff Corley, Deputy Director of Water Resources
City of Concord, NC

Mo Minkara, Water Quality Manager
City of Chattanooga, TN

Cory Rayburn, Watershed Manager
City of Atlanta, GA

10:00 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.
0.75 credits

Break in Exhibit Hall (Exhibits Open 10:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.)
Visit exhibit booths to learn about new and emerging technologies!
10:45 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.
(Stormwater Program Track)
0.75 credits

Resiliency vs. Adaptation As Our Storm Events Change
When is enough really enough?  Communities are facing increased challenges with extreme storm events, increased urbanization, higher community expectations on service, and limited funding. Technology and policy can be a Stormwater Manager's biggest ally in the struggle to achieve long-term objectives. This presentation will show how Fort Lauderdale, FL is attacking these issues head-on with a comprehensive approach.

Ron Geiger, PE, National Stormwater Practice Lead
HDR

Ryan Brown, Project Engineer
HDR

10:45 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.
(Technical Track)
0.75 credits

Bio-Sorption Activated Media for Control of Nutrients and Fecal Coliforms
Bio-sorption activated media (BAM) are those that initially remove water borne pollution using some chemical and physical removal mechanisms, and then further reduce the pollution using biological means. This presentation will review the fate of nitrates, total phosphorus and fecal coliforms after dosing infiltration basins with excess reclaimed water and stormwater. A basin with Bio-Sorption Activated Media (BAM) is compared to two other basins that use natural soils. Comparisons of removal effectiveness will also be presented.

Marty Wanielista, PhD, Professor Emeritus
University of Central Florida

11:35 a.m. - 12:20 p.m.
(Stormwater Program Track)
0.75 credits

Stormwater Management in Emergency Situations
Mecklenburg County, NC has maintained an emergency response effort to protect the environment since 1974. This has evolved into Charlotte-Mecklenburg Storm Water Services’ current partnership with the City of Charlotte's Fire and Police Departments, and the NC Department of Environmental Quality to respond to emergency situations 24 hours a day. This presentation will cover Charlotte-Mecklenburg’s approach, including the most important components for developing and maintaining a strong partnership with local and state agencies, plans and Standard Operating Procedures for notification, response and recovery during events, staff training and resources needed, and assessment of impacts after events

Kristen O'Reilly, Water Quality Program Specialist
City of Charlotte, NC

11:35 a.m. - 12:20 p.m.
(Technical Track)
0.75 credits

Urban Stream Mitigation: Negotiations, Bridges and Bugs
The Butterfly Branch stream restoration project has restored nearly 2,000 feet of a ditched and piped stream in downtown Spartanburg, SC. This project, along with the Butterfly Branch Greenway, is the centerpiece of the City’s Northside Redevelopment Project. It is the first in the southeast that is required to demonstrate its functional uplift by meeting both ambient water quality and benthic macroinvertebrate performance metrics during its five-year monitoring period. To fulfill this requirement, an innovative habitat enhancement and reference reach benthic relocation effort has begun to be implemented. This presentation will review the project.

Ward Marotti, Senior Project Manager
WK Dickson

Jay Squires, City Engineer
City of Spartanburg, SC

12:20 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.
0.50 credits

Networking Luncheon

1:30 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.
(Stormwater Program Track)
0.75 credits

A National Review of Innovative Stormwater Management Initiatives
New York City Department of Environmental Protection (NYCDEP) examined national and international stormwater programs to better understand characteristics of stormwater programs that are both integrated and innovative. The report, distributed by Water Research Foundation, is a cumulation of this examination of 34 communities. In addition to sharing a variety of case studies on the details of implementation techniques, the report presents the proportion of survey participants engaged in certain programmatic efforts along with program drivers. Local governments may use the trends reported to assess the state of their stormwater management efforts in relation to peer programs or identify innovative programmatic elements that may have local applicability.

Stephen Sands, PE, Senior Associate
Hazen and Sawyer 

Pinar Balci, PhD, Assistant Commissioner
NYC Department of Environmental Protection 

Floren Poliseo, Managing Director, Watershed Planning & Modeling
NYC Department of Environmental Protection

1:30 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.
(Technical Track)
0.75 credits

Optimizing the Restoration of Urban Streams at Every Stage
Through years of stream restoration, methods and practices have evolved to include new advances in the science behind streams, new technology to implement projects, and efforts to streamline many processes. But how often do we look back and see what works through every stage of the process? Or do we just get in a "groove" and plow through the planning and design? This presentation will go through the entire process - from planning, public outreach, stakeholder involvement and permitting, through design and construction, to outline a variety of places along the way where we can optimize the likelihood of a municipal stream restoration project success, and optimize the benefits.

Kelly Mattfield, National Stream Restoration Lead
Brown and Caldwell

2:20 p.m. - 3:05 p.m.
(Stormwater Program Track)
0.75 credits


A Drainage Improvement and Sea Level Rise Mitigation Project
The Calhoun West drainage basin in Charleston, SC has been a historically flood-prone area. The low elevation and flat topography of the lots and streets comprising the district make stormwater conveyance by conventional gravity systems nearly impossible under certain tide conditions. Flooding of streets poses many problems including restricting access to hospitals, diverting traffic around accumulated water, and damage to parked vehicles. This presentation will review a City of Charleston study for improving drainage and alleviating many of the existing drainage problems including deep tunnel conveyance and sea level rise. Ultimately, the project will increase the capacity of the stormwater collection and conveyance system, provide a means to convey stormwater directly into the Ashley River during storms and tidal events via tunnel and pumping systems, and mitigate approximately 2 ½ feet of sea level rise.

Jared Bramblett, PE, LEED AP, Civil Engineer
Davis & Floyd

2:20 p.m. - 3:05 p.m.
(Technical Track)
0.75 credits

City of Roswell - Impaired Streams Assessment
The City of Roswell, GA is proactively conducting stream assessments in an effort to identify and address issues that may be contributing to stream impairments and to better understand stream conditions. This presentation highlights three areas of stream characterization, stream inventory, habitat assessment, and maintenance identification.

Austin Brown, Project Manager
R2T 

Amanda Lester, Project Manager
R2T

Danelle Murray, PE , Water  Resources Engineer
City of Roswell, GA

3:10 p.m. - 3:55 p.m.
(Stormwater Program Track)
0.75 credits

Underwater and Out of Money
The overall cumulative impact of recent trends in residential development/re-development in the Old Village area of the Town of Mount Pleasant, SC is exasperating drainage and flooding issues in the watershed. In addition, more frequent and intense rainfall events, the effects of sea level rise and the increased occurrence and height of "king" tides resulted in the Town tackling multiple issues in an effort to alleviate flooding. This presentation will review Mount Pleasant’s efforts to tackle multiple issues in the area, including a holistic approach to asset management, resiliency, design and budget constraints.

Joe Fersner, PE, Project Manager IV
Thomas and Hutton

Hillary Repik, PACP, CEPSCI, SC BMP Inspector Certification Stormwater Manager/Stormwater Division Chief
Town of Mount Pleasant, SC

3:10 p.m. - 3:55 p.m.
(Technical Track)
0.75 credits

SWMM(ing) with Poop - BST Tracking for Watershed Improvement
Delisting a fecally-contaminated waterway can often be a time consuming and costly process for a community. Novel developments in technology and modeling techniques have recently emerged that can save communities time and money.  The City of Alpharetta, GA used Bacterial Source Tracking along Long Indian Creek to identify the contaminate source, model the contaminate transport with PCSWMM, and design targeted solutions to address the contamination. This presentation examines the efficacy of a watershed improvement plan designed with the knowledge of the fecal contaminant source.

Jill Bazinet, Senior Stormwater Engineer
City of Alpharetta, GA

Sam Fleming, Associate Vice President
Dewberry

3:55 p.m. - 4:25 p.m.
0.50 credits

Break in Exhibit Hall
Visit exhibit booths to learn about new and emerging technologies!

4:25 p.m. - 5:10 p.m.
(Stormwater Program Track)
0.75 credits

How to Win an Enforcement Case
Want to win your enforcement case? Make sure your inspection and paperwork make the cut! Enforcement cases can be won or lost with something as simple as sending an email to the wrong e-mail address. Anyone who reviews and implements city ordinances is considered a code enforcement officer - no matter your official title. Learn some of the important factors to winning an enforcement case, starting with your inspection and communication from day one. This presentation will review the proper steps to ensure a successful outcome if a court/administrative hearing is ever required. 

Demetria Kimball-Mehlhorn, Senior Program Manager
Lexington Fayette Urban County, KY

4:25 p.m. - 5:10 p.m.
(Technical Track)
0.75 credits

How Beaufort County Uses Drones in Stormwater Management
The drones are coming! For the last two years, Beaufort County, SC has been using drone technology to gather photogrammetric data for its GIS, Stormwater and various other department projects. The County has now started using drone technology to gather aerial imagery for impervious surface data for calculating Stormwater fees. Currently, impervious surface data is collected every year as part of a countywide aerial imagery project. The presentation will illustrate how adding drone technology to the workflow will allow impervious surface area to be automatically extracted and calculated as projects are completed, ultimately increasing productivity and efficiency while minimizing loss of revenue.

Eric Larson, PE, CPSWQ, AICP, CFM, Director Stormwater Utility
Beaufort County, SC

Robert Gecy, GIS Analyst
Beaufort County, SC

5:10 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
0.75 credits
Southeast Stormwater Association Annual Member Meeting and the Election of Board of Directors and Officers
6:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
0.75 credits

Reception in Exhibit Hall
Visit exhibit booths to learn about new and emerging technologies! A drink and light snacks will be provided.

Friday, October 5, 2018 / Regular Conference
8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. Registration Desk Open
8:00 a.m. - 10:35 a.m. Exhibit Hall Open
8:00 a.m. - 8:30 a.m.
0.50 credits
Continental Breakfast in Exhibit Hall
Visit exhibit booths to learn about new and emerging technologies!

8:30 a.m. - 9:15 a.m.
(Stormwater Program Track)
0.75 credits

The Ripple Effect of Developing a Stormwater Design Manual
It seems that every region is developing a Stormwater Design Manual. It's lots of work to develop a manual, and after months of overtime, you finally end up with a new manual! Your job is done, right? Wrong! Your job has just begun – you now need to address the related topics! This presentation will show how a "simple" requirement to adopt a statewide stormwater guidance manual turned into much more. We will discuss the unintended consequences that minor changes to long standing practices can have and share some of our lessons learned along the way.

Barbara Seal, Planning Manager
Gwinnett County, GA

Charles Crowell, PE, Stormwater Section Manager
Gwinnett County, GA

8:30 a.m. - 9:15 a.m.
(Technical Track)
0.75 credits

Post Development Water Quality - Who Are We To Question Nature?
Greenville County, SC has recently taken a sophisticated and innovative approach to post-development water quality regulation for new development projects. They have adopted a post versus pre development condition (or anti-degradation) policy related to phosphorous loading in the Reedy River watershed. This presentation will highlight the key components of the County's post-construction regulatory program, the results achieved to date and a demonstration of the design tool that makes this approach practical.

Brian Bates, PE, Project Director
Woolpert

9:20 a.m. - 10:05 a.m.
(Stormwater Program Track)
0.75 credits

City of Charleston Watershed Master Planning
The City of Charleston, SC has developed a comprehensive strategy to collect, assess and model the City's stormwater infrastructure for the purposes of long range planning with respect to aging infrastructure and sea level rise concerns. This comprehensive approach provides a systematic method that is both effective and repeatable throughout the City's various watersheds. This presentation will highlight the key components of the City’s project.

Geoff Smith, PE, Project Manager
AECOM

Kinsey Holton, PE, Stormwater Program Manager
City of Charleston, SC 

Gabrielle Skipper, PE, Water Resources Engineer
AECOM

9:20 a.m. - 10:05 a.m.
(Technical Track)
0.75 credits

Soaking It In - Permeable Paver Success In Historic Roswell
The City of Roswell, GA has successfully implemented several permeable paver projects, each with a different set of funding mechanisms, goals and objectives, public outreach activities, and lessons learned. This presentation will help other communities understand the design and construction of a low impact BMP in the City owned right-of-way.

Danelle Murray, PE, Water Resources Engineer
City of Roswell, GA

Laurie Hawks, Water Resources
Brown and Caldwell

10:05 a.m. - 10:35 a.m.
0.50 credits

Break in Exhibit Hall
Last chance to visit exhibit booths to learn about new and emerging technologies!

10:35 a.m. - 11:20 a.m.
(Stormwater Program Track)
0.75 credits

Integrated Water Resources Planning in Pinellas County
In Pinellas County, FL there is a driving need for the protection, conservation and improvement of water resources to better serve the citizens of the County. Pinellas County recently completed the first step of an Integrated Water Resources Management Plan (IWRMP) considering surface water, stormwater, water supply and wastewater. This presentation provides insight into methods and conclusions focusing on the interaction of each water resources program and tools to support the modeling of such interactions.

Scott McClelland, Vice President
CDM Smith

10:35 a.m. - 11:20 a.m.
(Technical Track)
0.75 credits

Erosion Assessments Using Exposed Tree Roots
Streambank and hillslope erosion can threaten infrastructure, water quality, ecological diversity and cause flooding from a loss of channel capacity in downstream receiving waters. Decision-makers need a realistic assessment of the level of risk posed by an erosion site in a timely manner, and can rarely afford to wait for multi-year erosion studies using traditional monitoring and survey methods. Changes in the annual growth rings of exposed tree roots after exposure to the elements allow us to utilize exposed roots that are available on project sites for erosion rate assessment. This presentation will demonstrate the use of this simple and practical approach to using exposed roots of trees to measure erosion and how various field methods may be used for risk assessment, site prioritization and long term-sediment modeling of watersheds.

Ian Jewell, Environmental Scientist
Freese and Nichols

11:25 a.m. - 12:10 p.m.
(General Session)
0.75 credits

Federal Update and National Stormwater Trends
The National Association of Clean Water Agencies will provide an update on water-related issues and US EPA’s stormwater program priorities at the national level, focusing on stormwater policy and permitting programs.

Emily Remmel, Director of Regulatory Affairs
National Association of Clean Water Agencies

12:10 p.m. Adjourn