2015 Annual Conference Agenda

SESWA Annual Conference
Wednesday - Thursday - Friday
Wednesday, October 14, 2015 / Pre-Conference
12:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. Registration Desk Open

12:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
(Pre-Conference)

Tour of Local Stormwater Projects
[Separate Registration Required] Join us for a tour of innovative stormwater projects in the Chattanooga area.  There are a limited number of seats available and we anticipate the tour filling up quickly. Register today!  Transportation will leave the hotel lobby promptly at 12:30 p.m. and will return no later than 4:00 p.m.  Please dress casually and wear comfortable shoes.

1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
(Pre-Conference)
3 credits

TMDLs in Region 4:  Development, Implementation and Monitoring
[Separate Registration Required]
Local government’s interest in Total Maximum Daily Loads is rapidly increasing as more direct connections are being required between the TMDL and implementation via the MS4 permit.  The session will review the TMDL development processes, including discussion of the pollutants of concern; data collection, modeling and monitoring; implementation of the TMDL through your MS4 permit; and, alternatives to the development of a TMDL.  State-by-state cases studies and comparative examples will be provided. The workshop will assist you and your MS4 in understanding the TMDL process, how to develop a strategic and cost effective monitoring plan, and what you can expect with TMDL implementation.

       Kyle Hall, Water Quality Modeler
       City of Charlotte, NC

       Scott McClelland, Vice President

       CDM Smith

       James Riddle, PE,  Project Manager

       Woolpert

       Forrest Westall, Principal, Director of Regulatory Relations
       McGill Associates

Thursday, October 15, 2015 / Regular Conference
8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Registration Desk Open
8:00 a.m. - 8:30 a.m. Continental Breakfast (by registration desk)

8:45 a.m. - 9:00 a.m.
(General Session)
0.25 credits

Welcome
Meet Our Stars! Join us to celebrate SESWA. The association has come a long way thanks to the support of stormwater professionals like you! While we wish we could personally thank each one of you, we invite everyone to join us for this kickoff event to recognize the leaders and visionaries that got us here.

         
Steve Leo, President
          Southeast Stormwater Association

9:00 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.
(General Session)
1.25 credits

Celebrating the Past - Looking to the Future
The Southeast Stormwater Association was formed in 2005 as a non-profit, regional association focused on services for stormwater professionals at the local level.  It has grown from an idea to over 170 organizational members in just 10 years, significantly expanding the depth and breadth of its services.  At the same time, stormwater permits and policies have changed significantly and are continuing to evolve. Has SESWA met the expectations of its original organizers and its membership?  How can the Association be better prepared to serve its membership as regulatory policies change over the next 10 years?  Join us for a discussion where the association and stormwater policy have been and where they’re headed! 

          Daryl Hammock, PE, Assistant Stormwater Manager
          City of Charlotte, NC

         Aylin Lewallen, Water Resources Group Leader
         Brown and Caldwell

         Jeff Corley, PE, CFM, Deputy Director of Water Resources
         City of Concord, NC

10:15 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.
0.5 credits

Break in Exhibit Hall (Exhibits Open 10:15 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.)
Visit exhibit booths to learn about new and emerging technologies!
10:45 a.m. - 11:20 a.m.
(Regulatory Track)
0.5 credits

Federal Update and National Stormwater Trends
As part of a new partnership with SESWA, the National Association of Clean Water Agencies will provide attendees with an update on the Administration and U.S. EPA’s stormwater program priorities, the focus on permitting, and potential impacts on the Phase II MS4 program. The session will also examine recent legal decisions that may set national precedent including the status of stormwater utilities and fee programs around the country.

         Brenna Mannion, PE, Director of Regulatory Affairs and Outreach
         National Association of Clean Water Agencies

10:45 a.m. - 11:20 a.m.
(Restoration/Retrofits Track)
0.5 credits

Lake Preservation - Lessons Learned in Hydraulic Dredging
The presentation will focus on a case study of a hydraulic lake dredging project in a residential subdivision in Franklin, Tennessee.  Multiple alternatives were evaluated and the City ultimately chose hydraulic dredging over mechanical dredging to satisfy the interests of the homeowners.  The presentation will walk-through the evolution of the project, including design/technical specifications considerations, contractor selection, adaptation for site conditions, and measurement/payment challenges.

          David Mason, PE, DWRE, Principal Water Resources Engineer  
          CDM Smith

          Paul Holzen, PE, Engineering Director 
          City of Franklin, TN

11:25 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
(Regulatory Track)
0.5 credits

Innovative Approaches to Satisfying MS4 Permits & TMDL Requirements
Due to the way Florida’s NPDES MS4 program is designed, the FDOT is a co-permittee on 15 Phase I MS4 permits and holds 12 Phase II permits, and must satisfy stormwater requirements under the Statewide Construction General Permit.  The expansive distribution and linear nature of FDOT's MS4 facilities, along with a lack of regulatory authority, create unique challenges to compliance with MS4 permit and TMDL requirements.  This presentation will discuss the innovative approaches implemented by FDOT to successfully comply with its NPDES permit requirements.        

         Steven Peene, PhD, Vice President
         Applied Technology & Management

11:25 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
(Restoration/Retrofits Track)
0.5 credits

Regenerative Stormwater Conveyances - Giving Old Outfalls New Life
Regenerative Stormwater Conveyances use a series of shallow aquatic pools, riffle weir grade controls, native vegetation and underlying sand and woodchip beds to detain, treat (nutrient AND sediment), and convey storm flows, especially first flush events.  This session will show how they provide effective end-of-pipe treatment in an otherwise constrained linear environment.         

         Ward Marotti, Senior Scientist/Project Manager
         WK Dickson

12:00 p.m. - 1:15 p.m.
0.5 credits

10th Anniversary Luncheon 

         Address: Jim Giattina, Director, Water Division
                          US EPA, Region 4

1:15 p.m. - 1:50 p.m.
(Regulatory Track)
0.5 credits

Integrating Stormwater Quantity and Quality Requirements Using the Runoff Reduction Method
Beaufort County has a unique hydrology that makes stormwater runoff the biggest challenge but also the greatest opportunity to protect the environment.   This session will explore how the Runoff Reduction Method was used in stormwater design standards to reduce runoff volumes and reduce pollutant loading in the receiving salt water estuaries.

          Eric Larson, PE, CPSWQ, AICP, CFM, Director of Env Engineering
          Beaufort County,  SC

1:15 p.m. - 1:50 p.m.
(Restoration/Retrofits Track)
0.5 credits

Utilizing a County-Owned Golf Course for Watershed Restoration
Gwinnett County utilizes county owned property for watershed restoration where possible.  A county owned Golf Club is one such example where stream restoration, restoration of on-line ponds, and the replacement of a stormwater dam that failed during historic 2009 floods have occurred. This session will present both the technical aspects of the restoration efforts and the attention to stakeholder goals that made the project a success.    

          Arvind Narayanan, PE, CFM, Water Resources Engineer III  
          Brown and Caldwell

          Laurie Hawks, Water Resources Scientist  
          Brown and Caldwell

          Pete Wright, PE, Engineer V  
          Gwinnett County, GA

1:55 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.
(Implementation Strategies Track)
0.5 credits


A County's IDDE Program goes "Mainstream": 40 Miles of Kayaking on the Reedy
During a five-day, 40-mile water quality kayaking effort on the Reedy River, Greenville County detected illicit discharges and natural water quality trends that are typically unidentified and often not accounted for in the development of TMDLs.  Points of Interest were reported to the County for sub-watershed investigations with an objective of further isolating potential discharges. In addition to illicit discharges, the County identified specific trends and behaviors within the river system.  This session will provide an overview of the project.   
         

         James Riddle III. PE, Project Manager  
         Woolpert

         Judy Wortkoetter, PE, County Engineer/Stormwater Manager  
         Greenville County, SC

         Ben Hammond, PE, EIT, Project Engineer 
         Woolpert

1:55 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.
(Green Infrastructure Track)
0.5 credits

Overcoming Design Waste with Clear Visualization of Green Infrastructure Design
This session will discuss the shortcomings of conventional design approaches, where mistakes can be made due to 'gaps' in the design process.  It will cover how these gaps can be overcome using visualization tools and a case study presentation demonstrating implementation of this approach.

          Zach Sample, PE, Green Infrastructure Design Products Manager
          XP Solutions

         Ashley Francis, Graduate Engineer  
         LJA Engineering & Surveying

2:35 p.m. - 3:10 p.m.(Implementation Strategies Track)
0.5 credits

A 319(h)-Funded Case Study: A Sustainable Approach to Financing Green Infrastructure
How are municipalities redeveloping historic areas, reducing impervious surface, and improving streams listed for fecal coliform? Section 319(h) grants help communities fund green infrastructure, greenways and streetscapes to address these issues.  This session will be divided into two sections: (1) A brief overview of the recent/current projects funded by the Georgia Section 319(h) nonpoint source implementation grants program to improve water quality and mitigate flooding in urban watersheds; and (2) a case study of the City of Roswell's Green Infrastructure Implementation and BMP Revolving Fund Project.

          Laurie Hawks, Water Resources Scientist  
          Brown and Caldwell

          Alice Champagne, Deputy Director Public Works  
         City of Roswell, GA

         Mary Gazaway, Communications/Outreach Specialist  
         Georgia DNR

2:35 p.m. - 3:10 p.m.(Green Infrastructure/LID)
0.5 credits

Pursuing Green Infrastructure for Stormwater Management at the World's Busiest Airport
What can you do about stormwater when the world's busiest airport is at the source of a major river? American Rivers and Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport are outlining a green infrastructure approach to stormwater management at the airport, located in the headwaters of Georgia's Flint River.  This session will review efforts to restore water quality and hydrology in the Flint River headwaters through the implementation of green stormwater infrastructure at the world's busiest airport.

          Ben Emanuel, Associate Director, Clean Water Supply Program
          American Rivers

          Polly Sattler, Senior Sustainability Planner
          Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport

3:00 p.m. - 3:40 p.m.
0.5 credits

Break in Exhibit Hall
Visit exhibit booths to learn about new and emerging technologies!

3:40 p.m. - 4:15 p.m.
(Implementation Strategies Track)
0.5 credits
A GIS-Based Approach for Septic System Risk Detection to Water Quality
This session will review a project originating from the need to locate non-point source fecal pollution in local waters in Henry County, Georgia.  Using a range of both commercial and open source GIS software and tools, we set out to identify individual septic systems that are at a high risk of being a fecal pollution source based on risk indicators derived from a wide range of GIS layers.
         

         Chris Reagan, GIS Analyst III  
         Henry County, GA

         Jeb Holder, Environmental Tech  
         Henry County, GA

3:40 p.m. - 4:15 p.m.
(Green Infrastructure/LID Track)
0.5 credits
Collaborating Toward a Green City Approach

As many cities across the country are required to adhere to the MS4 NPDES permits, the City of Chattanooga is taking a unique approach to meet new water quality standards.  The challenges faced with a new idea often boil down to community awareness.  With the push for Green Infrastructure, the City of Chattanooga is proactively offering various programs to assist in the transition and lessening the impact felt by the development community.  This presentation will provide an overview of Chattanooga’s programs. 

          Mounir Minkara, PE, PhD, Water Quality Manager
          City of Chattanooga, TN
4:20 p.m. - 4:55 p.m.
(Implementation Strategies Track)
0.5 credits


On-site Water Quality Treatment Banking - Getting your Best Bang for Your Buck
Meeting post-construction controls for water quality compliance on a large scale site that will experience short and long term development growth? Worried that a BMP built today may need to be moved in the future? Want to build the fewest BMPs possible while meeting stormwater regulations?  Join us for this session where we will review the dilemma that faced Charlotte's airport, one of the fastest-growing airports in the nation. 
         
          Ron Geiger, PE, Southeast Stormwater Lead
          HDR

4:20 p.m. - 4:55 p.m.
(Green Infrastructure/LID Track)
0.5 credits


Satisfying Montgomery County's MS4 Requirements Utilizing ESD & LID Design Techniques 
The County’s MS4 permit requires the restoration of impervious areas that aren’t currently treated to the Maximum Extent Practicable (MEP). This presentation discusses strategies to identify all ESD/LID opportunities, evaluate options and alternatives, design, and implement best management practices to the MEP within the public right of way.
  

        Amanda Baker, PE, LEED AP ID+C, Project Engineer  
        McCormick Taylor

        Kimi Schmidt, PE, Project Engineer  
        McCormick Taylor

5:00 p.m. - 5:45 p.m.
0.75 credits
Southeast Stormwater Association Annual Member Meeting and the Election of Board of Directors and Officers
5:45 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
0.75 credits

Reception in Exhibit Hall
Visit exhibit booths to learn about new and emerging technologies!

Friday, October 16, 2015 / Regular Conference
8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. Registration Desk Open
8:00 a.m. - 10:00 a.m. Exhibit Hall Open
8:00 a.m. - 8:30 a.m.
0.5 credits
Continental Breakfast in Exhibit Hall
Visit exhibit booths to learn about new and emerging technologies!

8:30 a.m. - 9:05 a.m.
(Stormwater Planning Track)
0.5 credits

Richland County Watershed Master Plan
Richland County, South Carolina recently developed a road map of projects and future directions for the Public Works, Stormwater and New Development Division's operations, including stormwater infrastructure, water quality improvements and floodplain management activities.  The session will focus on the process for identifying the current program status compared to desired levels of service, county plans and goals, project identification, and other activities.
         

        Synithia Williams, Stormwater Division Manager  
        Richland County, SC

        Quinton Epps, Stormwater General Manager  
        Richland County, SC

        Aylin Lewallen, Water Resources Group Leader
        Brown and Caldwell

8:30 a.m. - 9:05 a.m.
(Stormwater Toolbox Track)
0.5 credits

Bioretention Treatment of Horse Muck Runoff at the Kentucky Horse Park 
One of several water quality initiatives by the University of Kentucky under a 319 grant, this project sought to treat a high priority pollutant source entering Cane Run, a particularly sensitive impaired stream. The design-build project fast-tracked construction of a bioretention basin to treat horse muck runoff and followed with post-construction sampling.  The session will provide an overview of the project, interpretation of the monitoring results and lessons learned to support future designs for similar applications.     

      Bret Lavey, PE, ENV SP, Senior Associate
      Stantec

9:10 a.m. - 9:45 a.m.
(Stormwater Planning Track)
0.5 credits
District-Wide 2016 Water Resource Plan Update - NPS Edition
The Metropolitan North Georgia Water Planning District is embarking on the 2016 Water Resource Plan Update.  This presentation will discuss the integrated plan approach, provide details regarding strategy document development for NPS source and regional green infrastructure, and present local implementation case studies.
         

           Chrissy Thom, PWS, Senior Environmental Scientist  
           CH2MHILL

          Chris Faulkner, Senior Planner  
          Metropolitan North Georgia Water Planning District

9:10 a.m. - 9:45 a.m.
(Stormwater Toolbox Track)
0.5 credits

Which Competing Hydraulic Design Model Is Right For Your Municipality?
This session will provide a comparison between kinematic wave models (e.g. Hydraflow) and dynamic wave models (e.g. SWMM), reviewing the differing capabilities, and appropriate use scenarios. Validity criteria, experiences and practices of cities and counties in the southeastern US, and the pros/cons of each model will be reviewed.   

           David Perry, PE, Project Manager  
           WK Dickson & Co

9:45 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.
0.5 credits

Break in Exhibit Hall
Last change to visit exhibit booths to learn about new and emerging technologies!

10:15 a.m. - 10:50 a.m.
(Stormwater Planning Track)
0.5 credits

Pushing the Limits of Constructability Pushes the Limits of Project Planning
Pushing the limits of constructability, pushes the limits of project planning for the design and construction of major drainage improvements!  This session will highlight the project planning, constructability issues, and stakeholder coordination efforts that have occurred over the past 15 years for the planning, design and construction of nearly a mile long, 90-inch and 78-inch storm water by-pass culvert in Charlotte, North Carolina.

         Chip Smith, PE, Project Director / Senior Associate  
         Woolpert

         Kate Labadorf, PE, Senior Project Manager  
         City of Charlotte, NC

10:15 a.m. - 10:50 a.m.
(Stormwater Toolbox Track)
0.5 credits
Georgia's Updated, Adaptive Approach to Stormwater Management
The session will review the revised Georgia Stormwater Management Manual, which will provide guidance and tools to allow local governments and stormwater practitioners to develop an adaptive approach to stormwater management by encouraging the use of better site design practices and allowing for a combination of quality and volume based practices.
         

           Chris Faulkner, Senior Planner  
           Atlanta Regional Commission

          Charles Crowell, PE, Project Manager  
          AECOM (URS)

10:55 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.
(Stormwater Planning Track)
0.5 credits


Structuring Public-Private Partnerships for Stormwater Projects
Public-private partnerships have been used to develop everything from roads to courthouses.  The first stormwater public-private partnership in the U.S. was recently developed in Prince George's County, Maryland.  The session will discuss the groundbreaking new project, best practices and how your community may structure a similar program.

          Bradley Nowak Esq., Partner
          Morris, Manning & Martin

10:55 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.
(Stormwater Toolbox Track)
0.5 credits


Educating through Empowerment: Strategies for Active Community Education and Outreach

Educating the community on stormwater management issues is critical for program buy-in and success. Supplementing traditional education techniques with innovative active learning tools builds a more engaged and informed community. This session will explore active education strategies and includes a short hands-on tutorial.  

         Anna Truszczynski, PhD, Program Education Specialist  
         City of Athens/Clarke County, GA

         Kathryn Shepard, Stormwater Coordinator  
         City of Athens/Clarke County, GA

11:35 a.m. - 12:10 p.m.
(General Session)
0.5 credits
The Annual Rv Method for Site Level Green Infrastructure

A number of cities in Tennessee have adopted a new GI design and sizing approach that relies on the annual ratio of runoff to rainfall. This session will review the approach which merges natural and structural solutions into one coherent framework, providing site design flexibility but also recognizing LID design as a meaningful and measurable storm water management solution.

          Andy Reese, PE, LEED, Vice President  
          Amec Foster Wheeler

          Sara Johnson, Water Resource Engineer  
          Amec Foster Wheeler

         Mary Halley, PE, Branch Manager  
         Amec Foster Wheeler

12:10 p.m. Adjourn